Valar Morghules

Name: Ysabella S.
Zodiac: Scorpio

captashley:

dagger-kitsune:

baelor:

OK SOME REALLY SERIOUS SHIT IS HAPPENING IN NORTH KOREA
According to South Korean newspapers, last week the North Korean government PUBLICLY EXECUTED 80 people in 7 cities for watching South Korean/Western shows, movies, and videos, “pornography,” or possessing a Bible.
Apparently people’s attitudes and conformance are changing SO THIS IS HOW THE GOVERNMENT IS TRYING TO SUPPRESS DISOBEDIENCE
They allegedly herded 10,000 innocent civilians into a stadium where they were FORCED TO WATCH THE EXECUTIONS BY MACHINE GUN FIRE
THIS IS HONESTLY SOME HUNGER GAMES SHIT HAPPENING IN REAL LIFE RIGHT NOW
some of the more reputable sources: x, x

Other sources: The Sydney Morning Herald    The Los Angeles Times

oh my god

captashley:

dagger-kitsune:

baelor:

OK SOME REALLY SERIOUS SHIT IS HAPPENING IN NORTH KOREA

According to South Korean newspapers, last week the North Korean government PUBLICLY EXECUTED 80 people in 7 cities for watching South Korean/Western shows, movies, and videos, “pornography,” or possessing a Bible.

Apparently people’s attitudes and conformance are changing SO THIS IS HOW THE GOVERNMENT IS TRYING TO SUPPRESS DISOBEDIENCE

They allegedly herded 10,000 innocent civilians into a stadium where they were FORCED TO WATCH THE EXECUTIONS BY MACHINE GUN FIRE

THIS IS HONESTLY SOME HUNGER GAMES SHIT HAPPENING IN REAL LIFE RIGHT NOW

some of the more reputable sources: x, x

Other sources: The Sydney Morning Herald    The Los Angeles Times

oh my god

(via barnesholmesmoriartylaufeyson)

pregnantfitmom:

casualblessings:

May you have enough money to pay your bills this month with a little extra left over for a bit of fun.

This is one of the nicest things to wish for someone

(via stardust-to-dust)

marcomazzoni:

red progress

marcomazzoni:

red progress

(Source: tattoome, via deathsexfashion)

fini-mun:

Dude check out this shark

fini-mun:

Dude check out this shark

(Source: shalamakingfaces, via ghostpasta)

obliteratedheart:

Do you ever wonder about how an author would describe you in a novel? Not only your appearance but the way you talk and laugh and hold yourself and all the expressions on your face?

(Source: wingsofbadass, via i-am-a-direwolf)

slxvery:

click here for a SKATE/URBAN blog.

hokuto-ju-no-ken:

grubsludge:

funk-dabble:

littleleahlamb2k14:

grubsludge:

bury me in armor so I’ll be ready for the skeleton war

image

ready

why is his fricking chest uncovered? that’s ppor planning right there

what are you gonna do?

stab a skeleton in the heart?

no, I’ll play their rib bones like xylobones and destroy the morale of the skeleton army with my sick and delightful xylobone playing

(via stardust-to-dust)

trickstarbrave:

sometimes you hear the correct pronunciation for something and you just

refuse to acknowledge it at all

(via owlistic)

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

(via ethernius)


Hindu Sculpture of Ganesha

“I love people who are open-minded. People who just vibe with whatever you talk about. You can talk about anything and everything.”

(Source: imisshowitwasbefore, via aaidann)